Lapis ISSN 2398-2969

Nasal oxygen administration

Contributor(s): Vetstream Ltd, Lesa Thompson, David Vella

Introduction

  • Placement of a nasal catheter to supplement inspired air with oxygen.

Uses

  • Trauma/shock cases.
  • Post-operative cases where swelling or fluid obstructs the nasal passages.

Rabbits are obligate nasal breathers.

  • Medical cases benefitting from increased inspiratory oxygen concentration:
    • Respiratory tract disease, eg pneumonia   Pneumonia  , rhinitis   Rhinitis / sinusitis  , pulmonary neoplasia, aspiration, other upper and lower respiratory tract diseases causing dyspnea   Dyspnea  .
    • Cardiac disease.
    • Thoracic disease, pneumothorax, pleural effusion, trauma.
    • Other, eg septicemia, toxemia, shock.
  • During general anesthesia with injectable agents, nasal oxygen supplementation may be used. A small facemask may be held over the nares, or a catheter or small endotracheal tube may be placed intranasally for this.

The rest of this topic will discuss placement of nasal catheters in patients requiring longer term oxygen supplementation. 

Advantages

  • Can be placed in conscious patients.

Disadvantages

  • Nasal occlusion, eg discharges/swellings/masses, will make catheter placement more difficult.

Care in cases with upper respiratory tract disease, as there is a risk of transfer of pathogens to the lower respiratory tract if the catheter is pushed deeper into the respiratory tract.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

  • Usually tolerated well by patient, in part due to patients requiring this treatment frequently being debilitated.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references fromPubMed.
  • Ramer J Cet al(1999)Evaluating and stabilizing critically ill rabbits - Part 1.Comp Contin Educ Pract Vet21(1), 30-40.


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