ISSN 2398-2969      

Castration

Clapis
Contributor(s):

Synonym(s): Neuter, Dress, Desex


Introduction

Uses

  • Prevent breeding.
  • Reduce behavioral problems such as urine marking and aggression. Bonding two neutered male rabbits is much easier than bonding two entire male rabbits!
  • Reduce obsessive sexual behavior (copulatory actions) towards owners, shoes, toys or other animals.
  • Removal of retained intra-abdominal testis (unusual).
  • Removal of testis to treat inguinal hernia, testicular neoplasia, testicular torsion, severe testicular trauma, orchitis or epididymitis non-responsive to medical therapy (unusual).
  • Prophylactic castration is generally performed in the rabbit >4 months of age, although rabbits can be castrated as soon as the testicles are evident within the scrotal sac.
  • Testicles descend at 10-12 weeks, but the rabbit is unlikely to be fertile for a further 6-8 weeks.

Print off the Owner factsheets Neutering - why and when and Caring for your rabbit before and after surgery to give to your clients.

Advantages

  • Relatively simple surgical procedure.
  • Permanent solution to prevent breeding.
  • The use of chemical castration in male rabbits using deslorelin implants has not been particularly successful up until now.

Disadvantages

  • Rabbits possess an open inguinal ring that allows the testes to be withdrawn into the abdomen.
  • Herniation of abdominal contents through the inguinal canal after castration may occur, particularly if a closed castration is not performed Intestine: inguinal hernia - post-surgical castration.
  • A closed castration or an open castration with closure of the inguinal ring (also called open-closed technique or open technique with closure of the tunica vaginalis) are recommended to decrease the risk of herniation.
  • When unwanted behaviors develop late in life, castration is less effective to control them.
  • An anesthetic procedure is required.

Requirements

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Preparation

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Procedure

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Aftercare

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Prognosis

  • Hematomas resulting from overexertion after surgery are usually self limiting.
  • The hematoma may be removed to improve the cosmetic appearance.
  • Persistent bleeding into the surgical area should be controlled and adequate hemostasis achieved to prevent further hemorrhage.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Richardson V (2012) Urogenital diseases in rabbits. In Pract 34 (10), 554-563 VetMedResource.
  • Richardson C & Flecknell P (2006) Routine neutering of rabbits and rodents. In Pract 28 (2), 70-79 VetMedResource.
  • Boussarie D (2001) Routine sterilisation techniques in companion rodents and lagomorphs. Eur J Companion Anim Pract 11 (1), 61-78 VetMedResource.
  • Jenkins J R (2000) Surgical sterilization in small mammals. Spay and castration. Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract (3), 617-627 PubMed.
  • Meredith A, Redrobe S & Keeble E (1999) Neutering pet rabbits. Vet Rec 144 (12), 328 PubMed.
  • Lester-Cockx L (1999) Neutering pet rabbits. Vet Rec 144 (10), 271 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Harcourt-Brown F (2013) Neutering. In: BSAVA Manual of Rabbit Surgery, Dentistry and Imaging. Eds: Harcourt-Brown F & Chitty J. BSAVA, Gloucester. pp 138-156.
  • Harcourt-Brown F (2002) General Surgical Principles and Neutering. In: Textbook of Rabbit Medicine. Butterworth-Heinemann, Oxford. pp 352-360.

Organisation(s)

 
 

Related Images

Can’t find what you’re looking for?

We have an ever growing content library on Vetlexicon so if you ever find we haven't covered something that you need please fill in the form below and let us know!