ISSN 2398-2969      

Blood biochemistry: glutamate dehydrogenase

Clapis

Synonym(s): GDH, GLDH


Overview

  • Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a mitochondrial enzyme that is found predominantly in the liver, kidney and heart muscle.
  • GDH is found to a lesser extent in brain, skeletal muscle and leukocytes.
  • GDH is found at a higher concentration within the liver so an increase in blood levels are likely to be related to hepatic damage.
  • The enzyme is more concentrated within the centrilobular cells within the liver, therefore an increase in GDH implied centrilobular hepatic injury.
  • Increased serum GDH is indicative of damaged or necrotic hepatocytes due to liver disease.

Sampling

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Tests

Methodologies

  • Enzymatic method involving oxidation of NADH.

Availability

  • Variable.

Result Data

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Lindena J & Trautschold I (1986) Catalytic enzyme activity concentration in plasma of man, sheep, dog, cat, rabbit, guinea pig, rat and mouse. Approach to a quantitative diagnostic enzymology, I. CommunicationJ Clin Chem Clin Biochem 24 (1), 11-18 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • McLaughlin R M & Fish R E (1994) Clinical Biochemistry and Haematology. In: The Biology of the Laboratory Rabbit. 2nd edn. Eds: Manning P J, Ringler D H & Newcomber C E. Academic Press, UK. pp 115.
  • Wesche P (2014) Clinical Pathology. In: BSAVA Manual of Rabbit Medicine. Eds: Meredith A & Lord B. BSAVA, UK. pp 124-137.
  • Mark A et al (2012) The Laboratory Rabbit, Guinea Pig, Hamster and other Rodents. 1st edn. Elsevier, London, UK.

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