Lapis ISSN 2398-2969

Blood biochemistry: calcium

Synonym(s): Ca

Overview

  • Major constituent of bones and teeth.
  • Physiological functions include nerve transmission and blood clotting.
  • Comprises three fractions: ionized (50%, biologically active), protein bound (40%) and chelated to anions (10%).
  • Serum levels in rabbits are related to dietary intake.
  • Hypercalcemia has been proposed as a cause of renal disease, but is more usually seen as a sequel.
  • Hypercalcemia of malignancy does not typically occur in rabbits.
  • Total and ionized calcium levels should be assessed.

Sampling

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Tests

Availability

  • Routine availability at commercial laboratories.

Technique (intrinsic) limitations

  • Test results only significant in conjunction with other laboratory results and clinical findings.

Result Data

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references fromPubMedandVetMedResource.
  • Benson K G & Paul-Murphy J (1999)Clinical pathology of the domestic rabbit: acquisition and interpretation of samples. Vet Clin North Am Exotic Anim Pract2(3), 539-552PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Varga M (2014)Textbook of Rabbit Medicine.2nd edn. Butterworth Heinemann Elsevier, London.
  • Ardiaca M, Bonhevi C & Montesions A (2013)Point of Care Blood Gas and Electrolyte Analysis in Rabbits. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract16, 175-196. 
  • Harcourt-Brown F (2013)Diagnosis of Renal Disease in Rabbits.In: Vet Clin North Am Exotic Anim Pract16, 145-174.
  • Jeckl V & Redrobe S (2013)Rabbit Dental Disease and Calcium Metabolism - The Science Behind Divided Opinions. JSAP54(9), 481-490.
  • Wesche P (2014)Clinical Pathology in BSAVA Manual of Rabbit Medicine.Eds: Meredith A & Lord B. BSAVA, Gloucester, UK. pp 124-137.
  • Donnelly T M (1997)Basic Anatomy, Physiology and Husbandry.In: Ferrets, Rabbits and Rodents: Clinical Medicine and Surgery.Eds: Hillyer E V S & Quesenbery K E. Saunders, Philadelphia. pp 147-159.


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