Lapis ISSN 2398-2969

Therapeutics: gastrointestinal

Contributor(s): Ron Rees Davies, Nathalie Wissink-Argilaga

Anti-emetics and emetics

Anti-emetics

  •  The rabbit has a very tight cardiac sphincter, and true vomiting is extremely rare:
    • Occasional cases have been recorded of rabbits regurgitating but these may be esophageal regurgitation rather than vomitus. 
    • Terminal cases of mucoid enteropathy and intestinal obstruction sometimes regurgitate gastric material in the agonal stages. 
  • The use of anti-emetics is therefore unnecessary in the rabbit (see Modulators of intestinal motility below).

Emetics 

  • As above even if induction is attempted the rabbit is physically unable to vomit, and so emetics should not be used even in cases of known toxin ingestion, etc.

Anti-ulcer medications

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Antidiarrheal drugs

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Laxatives

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Modulators of intestinal motility

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Others

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Varga M (2014) Chapter 3: Therapeutics. In: Textbook of Rabbit Medicine. Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford.
  • Rees Davies R (2006) Chapter 8: Digestive System and Disorders. In: Manual of Rabbit Medicine.  Eds: Flecknell P & Meredith A. 2nd edn. BSAVA, Quedgeley. 
  • Harcourt Brown F (2002) Chapter 4: Therapeutics. In: Textbook of Rabbit Medicine. Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford.
  • Harcourt Brown F (2002) Chapter 10: Digestive disorders. In: Textbook of Rabbit Medicine. Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford.


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