ISSN 2398-2969      

Sticky bottom syndrome

Clapis

Introduction

  • The majority of rabbits presented with 'diarrhea' actually have an accumulation of uneaten cecotrophs around their perineum associated with the reduced ingestion of cecotrophs and/or the increased production of these cecal feces ('sticky bottom syndrome').
  • The diet is the single most important factor predisposing in the development of soft pellets. Rabbits on a high-fiber, low-carbohydrate and low-protein diet (hay, plant fiber and restricted dry food) rarely suffer from 'sticky bottom syndrome', true diarrhea or enterotoxemia Enterotoxemia (Clostridiosis).
  • Cause: inappropriate diet, obesity, dental disease, osteoarthritis, skeletal/visceral pain.
  • Signs: soft cecotroph pellets caked around perineum, often foul smelling.
  • Diagnosis: history, clinical signs.
  • Treatment: treat predisposing conditions, eg underlying dental disease, spinal/joint pain, obesity; convert onto diet with high-fiber content with low carbohydrate and protein.
  • Prognosis: excellent with successful dietary change; poor if no change in diet.

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Pathogenesis

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Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Williams C S (1975) Letter. Outbreak of gastric trichobezoars in New Zealand white rabbits. Lab Anim Sci 25 (1), 114 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Saunders R & Rees Davies R (2005) Cecotroph Accumulation. In: Notes on Rabbit Internal Medicine. Blackwell Publishing. pp 13.
  • Harcourt-Brown F (2002) Digestive Disorders. In: Textbook of Rabbit Medicine. Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford. pp 272-277.
  • Brown S A (1997) Gastrointestinal Physiology and Disease in the Domestic Pet Rabbit. In: Proc Waltham/OSU Symposium for the Treatment of Small Animal diseases. Ohio State University, USA. pp 27-28.

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