Lapis ISSN 2398-2969

Radiology: skull and dentition

Contributor(s): Aidan Raftery, Anna Meredith

Introduction

Image quality and type of film

  • Radiography film commonly used in canine and feline veterinary radiography will not always provide the detail necessary in these small mammals. 
  • A high resolution film such as a mammography x-ray film is highly advantageous, however standard radiographs with the use of a screen will also produce films of an acceptable standard. 
  • A radiology exposure chart should be developed for its use with each radiograph unit to ensure consistent results.

Indications for skull radiography  Radiography: skull (basic) 

Views and positioning

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Evaluation of the radiographs

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Acquired dental disease

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Contrast studies

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Canalography

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Chitty J & Raftery A (2006)An overview of Otitis in Rabbits. BVZS November Meeting.
  • Capello V, Gracis M &  Lennox M (2005)Rabbit and Rodent Dentistry Handbook.Zoological Education Network.
  • Raftery A & Varga M (2005)Skull Radiography Masterclass.BVZS November Meeting.
  • Popesko P, Rjtova V & Horak J (1992)A Colour Atlas of Anatomy of Small Laboratory Animals Volume 1: Rabbit, Guinea Pig.Wolfe Publishing Ltd.
  • Barone R (1973)Atlas D'anatomie Du Lapin.Masson.


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