Lapis ISSN 2398-2969

Radiography: film faults

Contributor(s): Vetstream Ltd, David Vella, Elisabetta Mancinelli

Introduction

  • Taking radiographs of adequate quality is essential or their diagnostic value may be compromised leading to misdiagnosis, eg missing lesions or lesion mimicked by inadequate positioning.
  • Common faults: artifacts, poor radiographic technique, or inappropriate patient positioning.

General faults

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Exposure faults

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Image density faults

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Processing faults

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Ewers R S & Hofmann-Parisot M (2000) Assessment of the quality of radiographs in 44 veterinary clinics in Great Britain. Vet Rec 147 (1), 7-11 PubMed.
  • Lee R (1984) Radiography problems and reasons for poor quality. In Pract (5), 154-160 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Jekl V (2013) Principles of Radiography. In: British Small Animal Veterinary Association. Eds: Harcourt-Brown F & Chitty J. pp 39-55.
  • Capello V, Lennox A M & Widmer W R (2008) The Basics of Radiology. In: Clinical Radiology of Exotic Companion Mammals. Wiley-Blackwell, USA. pp 2-16.
  • Morgan J P (1993) Techniques of Veterinary Radiography. 5th edn. Iowa State University Press, USA.


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