Lapis ISSN 2398-2969

Notoedric mange

Contributor(s): Anna Meredith, Joanna Hedley

Introduction

  • Notoedric mange is a rarely reported condition in the rabbit.
  • Cause: the burrowing mite Notoedres cativar. cuniculi.
  • Signs: intense pruritus with lesions on face, lips, nose and external genitalia.
  • Diagnosis: on skin scrapes, biopsies.
  • Treatment: ivermectin administration.
  • Prognosis: good.

Presenting signs

  • Rabbits usually present with intense pruritus, and lesions around the nose, lips and face.

Acute presentation

  • Lesions are initially seen on the nose and lips, before extending to involve the rest of the face.

Geographic incidence

  • Worldwide distribution, but rare in Europe and North America.
  • More commonly reported in Africa and India.

Age predisposition

  • None proven, but it has been suggested that younger animals may be predisposed.

Public health considerations

  • Notoedric mange is potentially zoonotic and may cause a transient pruritic dermatitis in man.

Cost considerations

  • Inexpensive to treat in individual cases, but in a group situation, the costs of treating all in-contacts and disinfecting the environment may add up.

Pathogenesis

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Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Sequelae

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Darzi M M, Mir M S, Shahardar R A et al (2007) Clinico-pathological, histochemical and therapeutic studies on concurrent sarcoptic and notoedric acariosis in rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Veterinarski Arhiv 77 (2), 167-175 VetMedResource.
  • Vohra S, Rath S S & Singh J (2005) Comparative efficacy of doramectin and ivermectin in rabbit mange. J Vet Parasitol 19 (1), 47-49 VetMedResource.
  • Hughes J E (2004) Diagnosis and treatment of selected rabbit dermatologic disorders. Exotic DVM (6), 18-20 VetMedResource
  • Aulakh G S, Singh J & Singla L D (2003) Pathology and therapy of natural notoedric acariasis in rabbits. J Vet Parasitol 17, 127-129 ResearchGate.
  • White S D, Bourdeau P J, Meredith A (2002) Dermatological problems of rabbits. Semin Avian Exotic Pet Med 11 (3), 141-150 ScienceDirect.
  • Jenkins J R (2001) Skin disorders of the rabbit. Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract (2), 543-563 PubMed.
  • Ravindran R & Subramanian H (2000) Effect of seasonal and climatic variations on the prevalence of mite infestations in rabbits. Indian Vet J 77 (11), 991-992 VetMedResource
  • Chhabra S, Nauriyal D C, Khahra S S et al (1999) Efficacy of moxidectin in notodectic mange in rabbits. Indian J Vet Med 19 (2), 109-110 VetMedResource.
  • Isingla, L D, Juyal P D, Gupta P P (1996) Therapeutic trial of ivermectin against Notoedres cati var. cuniculi infection in rabbits. Parasite (1), 87-89 PubMed

Other sources of information

  • Meredith A (2006) Dermatoses. In: Manual of Rabbit Medicine & Surgery. 2nd edn. BSAVA, Gloucester. pp 131.
  • Paterson S (2006) Skin diseases of Exotic Pets. Blackwell Publishing. pp 302.
  • Harcourt-Brown F (2002) Skin diseases. In: Textbook of Veterinary Medicine. Butterworth-Heinemann, Oxford. pp 244.
  • Hofing F L & Kraus A L (1994) Arthropod and Helminth Parasites. In: The Biology of the Laboratory Rabbit. 2nd edn. Academic Press Inc, New York. pp 233-235.


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