Lapis ISSN 2398-2969

Mouth: ptyalism

Synonym(s): Excessive salivation

Contributor(s): Sarah Pellett, Livia Benato

Introduction

  • Ptyalism is an excessive production of saliva which can lead to alopecia and moist dermatitis around the face and the neck area. 
  • Pseudoptyalism is where saliva accumulates in the oral cavity.
  • Cause: ptyalism is caused by pain due to dental disease, congenital malocclusion of teeth, periapical abscesses, gingivitis and stomatitis. It is also caused by ingestion of toxic substance, burn from chewing electrical wires and neurological disorders causing facial nerve palsy (otitis interna/media).
  • Signs: facial, neck and dewlap alopecia, wet fur, moist dermatitis, decreased appetite, anorexia, weight loss, bruxism, lack of grooming.
  • Diagnosis: ptyalism is a clinical sign and it can be confirmed during physical examination. The causes can be diagnosed by physical examination or imaging such as radiography.
  • Treatment: underlying causes need to be addressed and treated where possible.
  • Prognosis: depends on  the underlying cause, life-long treatment is required in rabbits with chronic dental disease.

Print off the Owner factsheet on  Ptyalism - excessive salivation to give to your clients.

Presenting signs

Age predisposition

  • No age predilection.

Sex predisposition

  • No sex predilection.

Breed predisposition

Pathogenesis

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Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Sequelae

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Crossley D A (2003) Oral biology and disorders of lagomorphs. Vet Clin North Am Exotic Animal Pract 6 (3), 629-659 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Harcourt-Brown F & Chitty J (2013) Facial Abscesses. In: BSAVA Manual of Rabbit Surgery, Dentistry and Imaging. Eds: Harcourt-Brown F & Chitty J. BSAVA, Gloucester. pp 395-422.
  • Oglesbee B (2011) Ptyalism. In: Blackwells Five Minute Veterinary Consult.Wiley-Blackwell, Chichester. pp 492-494.


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