Lapis ISSN 2398-2969

Moist dermatitis

Synonym(s): Slobbers, Urine scald/scalding

Contributor(s): Stephen White, Ron Rees Davies, David Scarff, Beatrice Funiciello

Introduction

  • Moist dermatitis is an uncommon dermatosis in domestic rabbits associated with bacterial infection of skin that remains moist for lengthy periods Diagnostic tree: urine scalding.
  • Cause: concurrent dental disease, urinary tract disease, lack of mobility and environmental problems are all possible contributory factors.
  • Signs: commonly affected areas include the face, chin (slobbers), the dewlap and the perineal skin (urine scald).
  • Diagnosis: history, signs.
  • Treatment: correct underlying condition, clip and clean skin.
  • Prognosis: good if underlying disease controlled.

Print off the Owner factsheet on Moist dermatitis - sore skin to give to your clients.

Presenting signs

Acute

  • Affected rabbits are presented with moist dermatitis affecting the face, chin, the dewlap, the ventrum or perineal region   Skin: ulceration 01    Skin: ulceration 02 - close-up  .
  • Skin is moist, erythematous, edematous, alopecic and may also be ulcerated and covered by thick exudate.
  • If Pseudomonas aeruginosa is involved, the skin may be discolored green or blue ('blue fur disease').

Morbidity

  • Depends upon contributing factors; may be individual with dental disease Dental malocclusion / overgrowth, skin folds or urine scalding Cystitis, obesity, lameness, uneaten cecotrophs, or a group problem with poor management and faulty drinkers (water bottles).

Mortality

  • May contribute in debilitated animals to decision for euthanasia Euthanasia.

Pathogenesis

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Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • d'Ovidio D & Santoro D (2013) Orodental diseases and dermatological disorders are highly associated in pet rabbits: A case-control study. Vet Derm 24 (5), 531-e125 PubMed.
  • Snook T S, White S D, Hawkins M G et al (2013) Skin diseases in pet rabbits: A retrospective study of 334 cases seen at the University of California at Davis, USA (1984-2004). Vet Derm 24 (6), 613-7, e148 PubMed.
  • Richardson V (2012) Urogenital diseases in rabbits. In Pract 34 (10), 554-563 VetMedResource.
  • Sant R & Rowland M (2009) Skin disease in rabbits. In Pract 31 (5), 233-238 VetMedResource.
  • White S D, Bourdeau P & Meredith A (2003) Dermatological problems of rabbits. Comp Cont Educ Pract Vet 25 (2), 90-101 SemanticScholar.
  • Garibaldi B A, Fox J G & Musto D R (1990) Atypical moist dermatitis in rabbits. Lab Anim Sci 40 (6), 652-653 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Miller W H, Griffin C E & Campbell K L (2013) Dermatoses of Exotic Small Mammals. In: Muller and Kirk's Small Animal Dermatology. 7th edn. St. Louis, Elsevier. pp 844-887.
  • Harcourt Brown F (2002) Skin diseases In: Textbook of Rabbit Medicine. Butterworth-Heinemann, Oxford. pp 224-248. ISBN: 0 7506 4002 2.
  • Scott D W, Miller W H & Griffin C E (1995) Dermatoses of Pet Rodents, Rabbits and Ferrets. In: Muller and Kirks Atlas of Small Animal Dermatology. 5th edn. W B Saunders. pp 1172-1174.


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