ISSN 2398-2969      

Anorexia

Clapis

Introduction

  • Even a short period of anorexia can lead to the development of ketosis and hepatic lipidosis. Anorexic rabbits have, or rapidly develop, gastric stasis   Gastric dilation and stasis  and intestinal ileus. The fluid in the digestive system is drawn out of the gastrointestinal tract, allowing any ingesta to dry, compact and cause a secondary obstruction. As little as 24 hours without food can have serious consequences for a rabbit.
  • Anorexia is a common clinical presentation in the rabbit. It can be a symptom of many different disease processes, and is commonly associated with any condition that may cause pain, as rabbits are very pain-sensitive. Stress, of any sort is another major contributory factor to the development of anorexia.
  • Diagnosing the cause of anorexia will require a detailed history, a full clinical examination, and often further diagnostic tests such as radiography, hematology and biochemistry, and urinalysis.
  • The rabbit is likely to need to need therapeutic support during the diagnostic process and before the diagnosis is reached.
  • The most common causes of anorexia are dental disease and gastrointestinal disorders (gastric stasis   Gastric dilation and stasis  , intestinal ileus or obstruction). Other diseases associated with pain such as urogenital disease   Cystitis  , pododermatitis   Ulcerative pododermatitis (Bumble foot)  and arthritis can also result in anorexia.
  • Any sudden diet change or lack of water for 24 hours can lead to anorexia. This is important if the rabbit is presented with water from an unfamiliar source or if the water supply freezes in the winter.
Print off the Owner factsheet on Anorexia to give to your clients.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Signs

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Clinical examination

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Ancillary tests

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Harcourt-Brown F (2002) Anorexia in rabbits 2. Diagnosis and treatment.  In Pract 24 (8), 450-467 VetMedResource.
  • Harcourt-Brown F (2002) Anorexia in rabbits 1. Causes and effects. In Pract 24 (7), 358-367 VetMedResource.

Other sources of information

  • Lichtenberger M (2008)Gastrointestinal Emergencies in Rabbits.In: Proc 51st Annual BSAVA Congress. pp 157-159.
  • Richardson V (2000)Rabbits, Health, Husbandry and Disease.Blackwell Science Ltd. Oxford.
  • Brown S A (1997)Approach to the Anorectic Rabbit.Paper taken from the proceedings of the Waltham/OSU Symposium for the treatment of Small Animal diseases, Ohio State University, USA. pp 27-28.

Related Images

RELATED CONTENT

Abdomen: abscess

Abdomen: adhesion formation - post-surgical

Analgesia

Arthritis: septic

Bladder: atonic bladder

Blood biochemistry: aspartate aminotransferase

Blood biochemistry: gammaglutamyl transferase

Blood biochemistry: potassium

Buprenorphine

Butorphanol

Carprofen

Cellulitis

Chemotherapy: complications

Cisapride

Coccidiosis

Colon: megacolon syndrome

Cystitis

Dental examination

Dental malocclusion / overgrowth

Diarrhea: antibiotic-associated

Disseminated intravascular coagulation

Electrical burn injury

Endometrial hyperplasia

Enrofloxacin

Enteritis / enteropathy

Enterotomy / enterectomy

Eye: nystagmus

Eye: retrobulbar abscess

Eyelid: blepharospasm

Fluid therapy

Gastric dilation and stasis

Handling - restraint

Herpesvirus infection

Hospitalization/nursing care

Hydrocephalus

Hypervitaminosis D

Intraosseous catheter placement

Isoflurane

Kidney: nephrotoxicity

Lead toxicity

Limb fracture

Lung: adiaspiromycosis

Metoclopramide

Nasogastric intubation

Nutrition: correcting the diet

Nutrition: dietary requirements

Obesity

Orogastric intubation

Ovarian cysts

Ovarian neoplasia

Pasteurellosis

Pneumonia

Poisonous plants

Probiotics and intestinal health

Radiography: abdomen

Radiography: skull (basic)

Radiology: thorax

Respiratory: neoplasia

Sedation

Skin: pyoderma

Sticky bottom syndrome

Submandibular gland disease

Therapeutics: gastrointestinal

Toxoplasmosis

Trichobezoars (hairballs)

Trimethoprim/sulfadiazine

Ulcerative pododermatitis (Bumble foot)

Urethrotomy

Urine: hypercalciuria

Vagina: discharge

Vagina: prolapse

Viral hemorrhagic disease 1

Viral hemorrhagic disease 2

Vitamin B

Weight loss

Related Videos

Tachypnea

RELATED FACTSHEETS

Anorexia

Want more related items, why not
contact us

Can’t find what you’re looking for?

We have an ever growing content library on Vetlexicon so if you ever find we haven't covered something that you need please fill in the form below and let us know!

 
 
 
 

To show you are not a Bot please can you enter the number showing adjacent to this field

 Security code