Lapis ISSN 2398-2969

Anesthesia: monitoring - pulse oximetry

Synonym(s): Hemoglobin saturation, Pulsoximetry

Contributor(s): David Perpinan, Molly Varga

Introduction

  • Pulse oximetry measures effective oxygenation of the blood by measuring oxygen saturation of hemoglobin (SpO2). It also measures heart rate.
  • The principle consists of measuring the light absorption characteristics of hemoglobin passing between the pulsoximeter probes (clamps).
  • Simple and non-invasive.
  • Normal SpO2 values should be no less than 96%.
  • While SaO2 (direct measurement of blood gases) is a better way to monitor oxygenation and detects changes more rapidly, SpO2 (pulse oximetry) correlates decently when oxygenation in above 85%. However, SpO2 is always higher than SaO2.

Use

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Limitations/sources of bias

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Optimizing results

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Vegfors M, Sjöberg F & Lindberg L G et al (1991) Basic studies of pulse oximetry in a rabbit model. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand 35 (7), 596-599 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Ozeki L & Caulkett N (2014) Monitoring. In: Zoo animal and wildlife immobilization and anesthesia. 2nd edn. Eds: West G, Heard D & Caulkett N. Wiley Blackwell. United States. pp 43-51.


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