Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Staining techniques: Giemsa

Synonym(s): Romanowsky

Contributor(s): Kathleen P Freeman, Karen L Gerber

Introduction

  • Romanowsky stains are neutral stains composed of a mixture of oxidized methylene blue (azure) dyes and Eosin Y.
  • The azures are basic dyes that bind acid nuclei and result in a blue to purple color.
  • The acid dye, eosin, is attracted to the alkaline cytoplasm, producing red coloration.
  • Buffer is critical to force the dyes to precipitate out of solution to bind sample material.

Uses

  • Stain cells to identify abnormalities/pathological changes.

Advantages

  • Readily available, easy to prepare, maintain and use.

Disadvantages

  • Working Giemsa stain must be prepared shortly before use.

Giemsa must be stored in a dark closet.

Requirements

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Procedure

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Aftercare

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Dacia Sir J V & Lewis S M  (2001) Practical Haematology. 6th edn, Longman Singapore Publishers Pte Ltd, pp 50-61.
  • Quin P J et al (1994) Clinical Veterinary Microbiology. Mosby. p 28.
  • Bain  B J (1989) Blood Cells, A Practical Guide. Gower Medical Publishing, pp  8-10.
  • Hall R & Malia R (1984) Medical Laboratory Haematology. Butterworth & Co (publishers) Ltd,  pp 132-136.
  • Pratt P W Laboratory Procedures For Veterinary Technicians. 3rd edn. Mosby pp 171,176.


ADDED