Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Pradofloxacin

Synonym(s): Veraflox®

Contributor(s): Gigi Davidson, Vetstream Ltd

Introduction

Name

  • Pradofloxacin.

Class of drug

  • Antibiotic.
  • Antimicrobial.
  • Fluoroquinolone.

Description

Chemical name

  • 8-Cyano-1-cyclopropyl-7-((1S,6S)-2,8-diazabicyclo[4.3.0]nonan-8-yl)-6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxo-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid.

Molecular formula

  • C21H21FN4O3.

Molecular weight

  • 396.42

Storage requirements

  • <30°C.
  • In a dry environment.

Uses

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Indications

Other infections

Administration

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Pharmocokinetics

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Precautions

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Interactions

With other drugs

Antibiotics

  • Combination with chloramphenicol Chloramphenicol, macrolide antibiotics or tetracyclines Tetracycline may produce antagonistic effects.

Anticoagulants

  • Fluoroquinolones may increase the anticoagulant effect of anticoagulants such as warfarin.

Adsorbent antacids (Mg, Al)

Oral cyclosporine

  • Fluoroquinolones may cause elevations of cyclosporine due to competitive metabolism.
  • Concurrent use of oral cyclosporine Ciclosporin with fluoroquinolones may cause transient elevations in creatinine and increase the risk of renal damage.

Sucralfate, iron, aluminium, and zinc salts

  • May inhibit absorption due to chelation; separate doses of these drugs by 6-8 hours.

Theophylline

  • Increases plasma theophylline levels Theophylline (in humans) - monitor carefully.

Dairy products (containing calcium)

  • May reduce bioavailability of fluoroquinolones.

NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)

  • Potential pharmacodynamic interactions in the CNS could lead to seizures (in susceptible animals).

Adverse Reactions

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from VetMed Resource and PubMed.
  • Lees P (2013) Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and therapeutics of pradofloxacin in the dog and cat. J Vet Pharmacol Ther 36(3), 209-221 PubMed.
  • Biswas S, Maggi R G, Papich M G, Keil D, Breitschwerdt E B (2010) Comparative Activity of Pradofloxacin, Enrofloxacin, and Azithromycin against Bartonella henselae Isolates Collected from Cats and a Human. J Clin Microbiol 48(2), 617-618 PubMed.
  • Dowers K L, Tasker S, Radecki S V, Lappin M R (2009) Use of pradofloxacin to treat experimentally induced Mycoplasma hemofelis infection in cats. Am J Vet Res 70(1), 105-111 PubMed.
  • Hartmann A, Krebber R, Daube G, Hartmann K (2008) Pharmacokinetics of pradofloxacin and doxycycline in serum, saliva, and tear fluid of cats after oral administration. J Vet Pharmacol Ther 31(2), 87-94 PubMed.
  • Messias A, Gekeler F, Wegener A, Dietz K, Kohler K & Zrenner E (2008) Retinal safety of a new fluoroquinolone, pradofloxacin, in cats: assessment with electroretinography. Doc Ophthalmol 116(3), 177-191 PubMed.
  • Litster A, Moss S, Honnery M, Rees B, Edingloh M, & Trott D (2007) Clinical efficacy and palatability of pradofloxacin 2.5% oral suspension for the treatment of bacterial lower urinary tract infections in cats. JVIM 21(5), 990-995 PubMed.

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