Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Therapeutics: skin

Contributor(s): Maggie Fisher, Linda Horspool, Rosanna Marsella, David Scarff, C Taylor, Charlie Walker

Introduction

  • Skin disease can be treated topically and/or systemically. The choice between topical and systemic therapy, or a combination of these modalities, is usually dependent on the diagnosis. For example, topical treatment may be the preferred route for surface-dwelling ectoparasite infestations (NeotrombiculaOtodectes, Cheyletiella spp), for surface and ideally superficial pyoderma and uncomplicated focal/regional inflammation. On the other hand, additional systemic therapy is necessary for deep pyoderma Deep pyoderma and for generalized inflammation as in atopic dermatitis Skin: atopic dermatitis
  • Topical and systemic therapy may be combined, such as in the treatment of flea allergic dermatitis Flea bite hypersensitivity, superficial bacterial pyoderma Bacterial skin disease: overview or generalized demodicosis Skin: demodectic mange
  • Agents used in the treatment of skin disease include barrier function therapies, anti-allergic or anti-inflammatory drugs, eg glucocorticoids Therapeutics: glucocorticoids, antimicrobials Therapeutics: antimicrobial drug (antibacterials, antifungals), antiparasitics Therapeutics: parasiticide, immunomodulators Therapeutics: immunological preparation, immunosuppressants, chemotherapeutics and more targeted antipruritics.
  • Barrier methods can be useful, with very pruritic, self-traumatizing cats, whilst awaiting for medication to take effect - soft Elizabethan collars, baby (or cat-specific) clothing and glued-on soft claw covers. 

Not all drugs are licensed for this species in all countries.

Dermatological vehicles

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Collars

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Topical medications - modes of treatment

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Topical medications - therapeutic applications

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Systemic medications - modes of treatment

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Systemic medications - therapeutic applications

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Systemic medications - less common therapeutic applications

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Key references
  • Bond R, Daniel O. Morris D O, Guillot J, Mason K S, Kano R, Hill P B (2020) Biology, diagnosis and treatment of Malassezia dermatitis in dogs and cats Clinical Consensus Guidelines of the World Association for Veterinary Dermatology (Clinical consensus guidelines of the World Association of Veterinary Dermatology). Vet Dermatol 31(1), 27-72 PubMed
  • Mueller R S, Rosenkrantz W, Besignor E, Karas-Tecza J, Paterson T, Shipstone M A (2020) Diagnosis and Treatment of demodicosis in dogs and cats (Clinical Consensus Guidelines of the World Association of Veterinary Dermatology). Vet Dermatol 31 (1), 4-26 PubMed.
  • Moriello K A,  Coyner K, Paterson S & Mignon B (2017) Diagnosis and treatment of dermatophytosis in dogs and cats. (Clinical Consensus Guidelines of World Association for Veterinary Dermatology). Vet Dermatol 28 (3),266-e68 PubMed.
  • Morris D O, Loeffler A, Davis M F, Guardabassi L, Scott Weese J (2017) Recommendations for approaches to meticillin‐resistant staphylococcal infections of small animals: diagnosis, therapeutic considerations and preventative measures (Clinical Consensus Guidelines of World Association for Veterinary Dermatology). Vet Dermatol 28 (3), 304-e69 PubMed.
  • Olivry T, De Boer D J, Favrot C, Jackson H, Mueller R S, Nuttall T, Prelaud P (2015) Treatment of canine atopic dermatitis: 2015 updated guidelines from the International Committee on Allergic Diseases of Animals (ICADA). BMC Vet Res 11, 210 PubMed.
  • Beco L, Guaguère E, Lorente Méndez C, Noli C, Nuttall T, Vroom M (2013) Suggested guidelines for using systemic antimicrobials in bacterial skin infections. Vet Rec 172 (3),72-78 PubMed & 172(6), 156-160 PubMed
Other references
  •  Bizokova P, Burrows A (2019) Feline Pemphigus foliaceus: original case series and a comprehensive literature review. BMC Vet Res 15(22), 1-15 PubMed.
  • Maina E, Fontaine J (2019) Use of maropitant for the control of pruritus in non-flea, nonfood-induced feline hypersensitivity dermatitis: an open label uncontrolled pilot study. J Fel Med Surg 21, 967-972 PubMed.
  • Noli C, Della Valle MF, Miolo A, Medori C, Schievano C; Skinalia Clinical Research Group (2019) Effect of dietary supplementation with ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide in maintaining remission in cats with nonflea hypersensitivity dermatitis: a double-blind, multicentre, randomized, placebo-controlled study.​ Vet Dermatol 5(30), 387-e117 PubMed.
  • Noli C, Matricoti I, Schievano C (2019) A double-blinded, randomized, methyl- prednisolone-controlled study on the efficacy of oclacitinib in the management of pruritus in cats with non-flea non-food-induced hypersensitivity dermatitis. Vet Dermatol 30, 110–e30 PubMed.
  • Wildermuth K, Zabel S, Rosychuk R A W (2013) The efficacy of cetirizine hydrochloride on the pruritus of cats with atopic dermatitis: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Vet Dermatol 24, 576-e138 PubMed.  
  • Schmidt V, Buckley L M, McEwan N A et al (2011) Efficacy of a 0.0584% hydrocortisone aceponate spray in presumed feline allergic dermatitis: an open label pilot study. Vet Dermatol 23, 11-e4 PubMed.
  • Wildermuth B E, Griffin C E, Rosenkrantz W (2011) Response of feline eosinophilic plaques and lip ulcers to amoxicillin trihydrate–clavulanate potassium therapy: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled prospective study. Vet Dermatol 23,110-e25 PubMed.  
  • Noli C, Scarampella F (2006) Prospective open pilot study on the use of ciclosporin for feline allergic skin disease. JSAP 47 (8), 434-438 PubMed
  • Wildermuth B E, Griffin C E, Rosenkrantz W S (2006) Feline pyoderma therapy. Clin Tech Small Anim Pract 21 (3), 150-156 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Walker C (2019) Treatment of Demodex gatoi mange in two sibling Bengal Cats with a combination of selamectin and sarolaner. Companion Animal 24 (3), 2-6.
  • Proceedings of the ESVD Therapeutics Workshop, Davos, Switzerland (2018). 
  • Proceedings of the British Veterinary Dermatology Study Group www.bvdsg.org.uk/ accessed 29.04.2020.
  • Miller W H, Griffin C E, Campbell K L (2013) Muller & Kirk's Small Animal Dermatology. 7th edition. Saunders, Philadelphia. 
  • Gunn-Moore D, Dean R, Shaw S (2010) Mycobacterial infections in cats and dogs. In Practice 32, 444-452.  


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