Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Therapeutics: nutrition

Contributor(s): Tad Coles, Alison Jones, Lauren Trepanier

Parenteral nutrition

  • Nutritionally adequate substitute   Dietetic diet: for convalescence  where oral intake not possible, insufficient or contraindicated over long period.
  • Enteral nutrition (eg via naso-esophageal, esophagostomy   Esophagostomy feeding tube placement  , or gastrostomy tube   Gastrostomy: percutaneous tube (endoscopic)  ) always preferable whenever possible. Enteral nutrition reduces the risk of gut mucosal trophy and bacterial translocation.
  • Based on high concentrations of glucose or lipid emulsions for calories, soya or casein protein hydrolysates or amino acids for protein source.
  • Provide daily energy requirements as 60-90% carbohydrate, 60-90% lipids; increase calorie requirement by 50% in ill or trauma patients.
  • Requirements vary depending on condition treated - see specific clinical condition.
  • Give only IV via central veins.
  • Daily calorie requirements:
    • Basal energy requirement (kcal/day) = 30 x bodyweight (kg) + 70.
  • Partial parenteral nutrition (only meeting part of total daily caloric needs) can be provided with IV amino acids or IV lipid emulsions; peripheral vein can be used.

Minerals

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Vitamins

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Clinical Diets

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers
  • Recent refereces fromPubMed.
  • Bennett N et al(2006)Comparison of a low carbohdrate-low fiber diet and a moderate carbohydrate-high fiber diet in the management of feline diabetes mellitus. J Fel Med Surg8(2), 73-84PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Hand et al(2000) In: Small Animal Clinical Nutrition. 4th Edn.


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