Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Axillary wound

Contributor(s): Andrew Gardiner

Pathogenesis

  • Most feline axillary wounds arise when one foreleg becomes entrapped through the neck collar, but any similar constriction in this area (eg maliciously placed elastic band) is likely to have the same effect Wound: axillary 01  Wound: axillary 02 .
  • Unless the limb is released promptly, ischemia and pressure necrosis result in a skin wound which may become secondarily infected.
  • Most chronic axillary wounds are found in cats that have been missing from their home environment for some time.
  • These wounds can be extremely frustrating, and expensive, to treat.

Inciting or perpetuating causes

In many cases, the perpetuating case is the immediate environment of the wound, which tends to delay or prevent healing. The axillary area is warm, moist and subject to constant motion and tension. These factors may frustrate repeated attempts at closure of these wounds by means of conventional suturing techniques.

Treatment options

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Surgical options

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Surgical procedure

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Outcome

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from VetMed Resource and PubMed.
  • Lascelles B D X, Davison L, Dunning M, Bray J P, White R A S (1998) Use of omental pedicle grafts in the management of non-healing axillary wounds in 10 cats. JSAP 39, 475-480.
  • Brockman D J, Pardo A D, Conzemius M G, Cabell L M, Trout N J (1996) Omentum-enhanced reconstruction of chronic non-healing wounds in cats - techniques and clinical use. Vet Surg 25, 99-104.


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