Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Ureter: trauma

Contributor(s): Elisa Mazzaferro, Susan Rackard

Introduction

  • Less common than in the dog.
  • Cause:
    • Avulsion - may result from blunt abdominal trauma.
      In all cases of trauma discuss with owner the potential complications at the time of injury.
    • Rupture - ballistic injuries, urolithiasis Urolithiasis, attempts to clear urethral obstruction Urethra: obstruction.
  • Signs: cellulitis (retroperitonitis) due to leakage of urine; electrolyte abnormalities.
  • Diagnosis: signs, contrast radiography.
  • Treatment: correct underlying electrolyte or metabolic abnormalities then surgical repair.
  • Prognosis: renal function may not be impaired if opposite kidney and ureter are unaffected.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Avulsion: may result from blunt abdominal trauma Ureter: trauma.
  • Rupture: ballistic injuries, urolithiasis Urolithiasis.
  • Iatrogenic: inclusion of ureter in ligatures during ovariohysterectomy Ovariohysterectomy (rarely).

Pathophysiology

  • Uncommon, usually damage close to the kidney or bladder.

Timecourse

  • Days to week.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Degner D A, Walshaw R (1996) Healing responses of the lower urinary tract. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 26 (2), 197-206 PubMed.
  • Bjorling D E (1984) Traumatic injuries of the urogenital system. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 14 (1), 61-76 PubMed.
  • Thornhill J A, Cechner P E (1981) Traumatic injuries to the kidney, ureter, bladder, and urethra. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 11 (1), 157-169 PubMed.


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