Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Spinal neoplasia

Contributor(s): Agnes Delauche, Laura Garrett, David Godfrey, Irene Rochlitz

Introduction

  • Relatively uncommon disease.
  • Cause:
  • Signs: neurological deficits, hind limb paresis (depending on the localization along the spinal column).
  • Diagnosis: survey radiographs - myelography, cytological examination of cerebrospinal fluid, response to therapy.
  • Treatment: chemotherapy (for lymphoma); surgical decompression for osteosarcoma.
  • Prognosis: guarded.

Pathogenesis

Pathophysiology

  • Lymphoma arises from extramedullary hematopoeitic tissue in epidural fat   →   neoplastic cells accumulate in extradural space and may infiltrate meninges, vertebrae or muscles   →   pressure on spinal cord   →   clinical signs.
  • Rarely intradural lymphoma may occur.

Timecourse

  • Days to weeks.
  • Clinical signs usually develop acutely and progress rapidly.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Lane S B, Kornegay J N, Duncan J R et al (1994) Feline spinal lymphosarcoma: A retrospective evaluation of 23 cats. JVIM (2), 99-104 PubMed.
  • Spodnick G J, Berg J, Moore F M et al (1992) Spinal lymphoma in cats: 21 cases (1946-1989). JAVMA 200 (3), 373-376 VetMedResource.
  • Northington J W & Juliana M M (1978) Extradural lymphosarcoma in six cats. JSAP 19 (7), 409-16 PubMed.


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