Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Skin: sarcoptic mange

Contributor(s): Rosanna Marsella, David Scarff, David Godfrey

Introduction

  • Extremely rare in the cat.
  • Associated with underlying disease, especially feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Feline leukemia virus disease , or immunosuppressive medication, eg progestagens or glucocorticoids.
  • Cause: mite Sarcoptes scabiei  Sarcoptes scabiei  ; highly contagious to Canidae, humans and many other mammals   Sarcoptes scabiei var canis in man  .
  • Signs: pruritus, self trauma, scaling.
  • Treatment: there are no licensed treatments but some commonly used routine flea and tick control agents are likely to be effective - selamectin, imidacloprid/moxidectin, fluralaner.
  • Prognosis: guarded unless treated.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

Predisposing factors

General

Epidemiology

  • Transmitted via direct contact, indirect contact and fomites.
  • Entire lifecycle on host Lifecycle: Sarcoptes scabiei - diagram .
  • Adult female mite Sarcoptes scabiei: female tunnels through epidermis  →  eggs Sarcoptes scabiei: egg  Sarcoptes scabiei var canis - egg  Sarcoptes scabiei: empty egg case and feces  →  reaction.
  • Wild Canidae are reservoir of infection, especially urban fox.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Taenzler J, Liebenberg J, Roepke R K et al (2016) Efficacy of fluralaner administered either orally or topically for the treatment of naturally acquired Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis infestation in dogs. Parasite Vectors (1), 392 PubMed.
  • Malik R, McKellar Stewart K, Sousa C A et al (2006) Crusted scabies (sarcoptic mange) in four cats due to Sarcoptes scabei infestation. J Feline Med Surg (5), 327-339 PubMed.
  • Six R H, Clemence R G, Thomas C A et al (2000) Efficacy and safety of selamectin against Sarcoptes scabiei on dogs and Otodectes cynotis on dogs and cats presented as veterinary patients. Vet Parasitol 91 (3-4), 291-309 PubMed.
  • McAllister E (1993) Sarcoptic mange. Vet Rec 132 (5), 120 PubMed.
  • Kershaw A (1989) Sarcoptes scabiei infestation in a cat. Vet Rec 124 (20), 537-538 PubMed.
  • Hawkins J A, McDonald R K, Woody B J (1987) Sarcoptes scabiei infestation in a cat. JAVMA 190 (12), 1572-1573 PubMed.
  • Scott D W & Horn R T Jr. (1987) Zoonotic dermatoses of dogs and cats. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 17 (1), 117-144 PubMed.
  • Reedy L M (1986) Common parasitic problems in small animal dermatology. JAVMA 188 (4), 362-364 PubMed.

Other sources

  • Miller W H Jr, Griffin C E & Campbell KL (2013) Canine scabies. In: Muller and Kirk's Small Animal Dermatology 7th editionW B Saunders, Philadelphia. pp 317-318.


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