Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Prostate gland: neoplasia

Contributor(s): Philip K Nicholls, Marion O'Leary

Introduction

  • Prostate - a bilobed structure, at level of cranial pubic brim, halfway between penis and bladder neck (more caudal than in the dog).
  • Some prostate tissue in urethral wall.
  • Uncommon, eg 3 of 3248 feline tumors.
  • Prostatic disease uncommon perhaps due to high rate of castration and difficulty of examining prostate, or for biological reasons.
  • Older cats 6y-22y.
  • Signs: dysuria, urinary obstruction, hematuria, pollakiuria.
  • Diagnosis: signs, biopsy.
  • Treatment: High metastatic rate and poor prognosis often precludes treatment.
  • Prognosis: Poor, due to metastasis and refractory dysuria and urinary obstruction.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

Pathophysiology

  • Enlarged prostate from tumor growth causes urinary obstruction, rectal compression.
  • Typically invasive, with metastatic potential (eg to lungs, pancreas).

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Caney S M, Holt P E, Day M J et al (1998) Prostatic carcinoma in two cats. JSAP 39 (3), 140-143 PubMed.
  • Holt P E (1992) Aspects of feline urology. Vet Ann 32, 13-28 VetMedResource.
  • Hubbard B S, Vulgamott J C & Liska W D (1990) Prostatic adenocarcinoma in a cat. J Am Vet Med Assoc 197 (11), 1493-1494 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Carpenter J L, Andrews K L and Holzworth J (1987) Chapter 11. Tumors and tumor-like lesions. In: Holzworth J (Ed) Diseases of the cat  - Medicine and surgery. pp 518-520. WB Saunders.


ADDED