Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Pancreas: fluke

Contributor(s): Philip K Nicholls, Kenneth Simpson

Introduction

  • Cause: parasitic fluke Eurytrema procyonis.
  • Signs: often vague, weight loss, vomiting Vomiting.
  • Diagnosis: demonstration of fluke eggs in feces.
  • Treatment: flukicides, eg fenbendazole, praziquantel.
  • Prognosis: fair.

Pathogenesis

Predisposing factors

General

  • Outdoor cats at increased risk as exposure to intermediate host required for infection.

Pathophysiology

  • Presence of flukes causes inflammation and fibrosis or can cause direct obstruction to pancreatic ducts.
  • Ingestion of intermediate host, eg snail or grasshopper   →   infection with fluke.
  • Flukes live in pancreatic ducts   →   thickening and distension of ducts.
  • Chronic obstruction   →   pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy   →   signs of pancreatic disease.
  • Fluke eggs shed in feces.

Timecourse

  • Months to years.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Anderson W I, Georgi M E & Car B D (1987) Pancreatic atrophy and fibrosis associated with Eurytrema procyonis in a domestic cat. Vet Rec 120 (10), 235-236 PubMed.
  • Fox J N, Mosley J G, Vogler G A et al (1981) Pancreatic function in domestic cats with pancreatic fluke infection. JAVMA 178 (1), 58-60 PubMed.
  • Sheldon W G (1966) Pancreatic flukes (Eurytrema procyonis) in domestic cats. JAVMA 148 (3), 251-253 PubMed.


ADDED