ISSN 2398-2950      

Otodectes disease

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Synonym(s): Ear mite


Introduction

  • Cause: ear mite, Otodectes cynotis.
  • Signs: pruritic ears, red-brown otic discharge, generalized skin disease.
  • Diagnosis: ear swab and microscopy, direct visualization.
  • Treatment: otic parasiticides, whole body insecticides, ivermectin, treat all in-contact pets.
  • Prognosis: good.
Print off the owner factsheet Ear problems in your cat to give to your client.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

Specific

  • Contact with carrier animals.

Pathophysiology

  • Ear mites  Otodectes cynotis: adult feed on epidermal debris  →  irritates ear canal  →  cerumen, blood and mite exudate accumulates.
  • Mites on other parts of the body (neck, rump, tail)  →  feed  →  pruritic dermatitis in some animals.
  • Immediate hypersensitivity reaction may occur.

Timecourse

  • Variable.

Epidemiology

  • O. cynotis is a non-host specific, surface living, large, white, freely moving mite.
  • Eggs have a four-day incubation, adults a two month lifespan; the lifecycle lasts three weeks.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from VetMed Resource and PubMed.
  • Sotiraki S T, Koutinas A F, Leontides L S et al (2001) Factors affecting the frequency of ear canal and face infestation by Otodectes in the cat. Vet Parasitol 96 (4), 309-315 PubMed.
  • Engelen M A & Anthonissens E (2000) Efficacy on non-acaricidal containing otic preparations in the treatment of otoacariasis in dogs and cats. Vet Rec 147 (20), 567-569 PubMed.
  • Shanks D J, McTier T L, Rowan T G et al (2000) The efficacy of selamectin in the treatment of naturally acquired aural infestation otodectes cynotis on dogs and cats. Vet Parasitol 91 (3-4), 283-290 PubMed.
  • Six R H, Clemence R G, Thomas C A et al (2000) Efficacy and safety of selamectin against Sarcoptes scabiei on dogs and Otodectes cynotis on dogs and cats presented as veterinary patients. Vet Parasitol 91 (3-4), 291-309 PubMed.
  • Song M D (1991) Using Ivermectin to treat feline dermatosis caused by external parasites. Vet Med 86 (5), 498-502 AGRIS FAO.
  • Powell M B, Weisbroth S H, Roth L et al (1980) Reaginic hypersensitivity in Otodectes cynotis infestation of cats and mode of mite feeding. Am J Vet Res 41 (6), 877-82 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Miller W H, Griffin C E & Campbell K L (2013) Muller and Kirk's Small Animal Dermatology. 7th edn. Philadelphia: W B Saunders. pp 298-300 (detailed dermatology textbook for in-depth reading).

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