Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Kidney: developmental anomaly

Contributor(s): Penney Barber

Introduction

  • Cause: familial disease in certain breeds.
  • Signs: usually asymptomatic, occasionally present with chronic renal failure Kidney: chronic kidney disease.
  • Diagnosis: radiography, ultrasonography.
  • Treatment: none.
  • Prognosis: guarded if chronic renal failure, animal may be normal.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Congenital.
  • Familial.

Pathophysiology

Agenesis

  • Unilateral agensis is usually asymptomatic (unless other kidney is damaged).
  • More commonly affects right kidney than left.
  • In female ipsilateral uterine horn is absent but ovary normal.
    If one uterine horn absent at time of spay check for presence of kidney.

Fusion

  • Isolated reports but very rare.

Ectopia

  • Isolated case reports of congenital ectopis, frequently bilateral.
  • Occasionally occurs as a result of trauma.

Congenital polycystic disease

Primary familial nephropathy

  • Abnormal development of renal parenchyma   →   immature glomeruli and other inappropriate structures   →   renal failure.
  • ?Not reported in cats.
  • Familial amyloidosis in Abyssinian cats Abyssinian.

Diagnosis

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • King G J & Johnson E H (2000) Hypospadias in a Himalayan cat. JSAP 41 (11), 508-510 PubMed.
  • Johnson C A (1979) Renal ectopia in a cat - a case report and literature review. JAAHA 15 (5), 599-602 VetMedResource.
  • Robinson G W (1965) Uterus unicornis and unilateal renal agenesis in a cat. JAVMA 147 (5), 516-8 PubMed.


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