ISSN 2398-2950      

Intussusception

ffelis
Contributor(s):

Ed Hall

Cheryl Hedlund


Introduction

  • Suspect in any young animal with history consistent with intestinal obstruction.
  • Invagination of a portion of gastrointestinal tract into a posterior or preceding segment of intestine.
  • Most common in young animals, located near the ileocolic valve.
  • Cause: intestinal irritation  →  vigorous contraction of a segment of intestine into the lumen of the adjacent relaxed segment.
  • Diagnosis: palpation, radiography.
  • Treatment: usually require surgical correction.
  • Prognosis: good (but depends on underlying disease).

Pathogenesis

Predisposing factors

General

Pathophysiology

  • A portion of the gastrointestinal tract invaginates into a posterior or preceding segment of intestine.
  • Circulatory embarassment  →  ischemic necrosis and localized peritonitis.
  • Results in partial or complete intestinal obstruction Intestine: obstruction.
  • Vigorous contraction of a segment of intestine into the lumen of the adjacent relaxed segment.
  • The blood supply to the intussuscepted piece of gut is compromized due to its inclusion in the invagination.
  • Initially, venous occlusion is present, resulting in edema of the bowel; if prolonged, can eventually cause arterial occlusion and necrosis.
  • Eventually, fibrinous adhesions can form, making spontaneous or surgical reduction of the intussusception less likely.
  • Results in partial or complete intestinal obstruction Intestine: obstruction.

Timecourse

  • Days to weeks.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Borgarelli M, Biller D S, Goggin J M & Bussadori C (1998) Ultrasonographic examination of the gastrointestinal system. Part 2 - Ultrasonographic identification of gastrointestinal disease. JSAP (2), 57.
  • Culvenor J A (1997) Peritonitis following intestinal anastomosis and enteroplication in a kitten with intussusception. Aust Vet J 75 (3), 175-177 PubMed.
  • Williams J, Reichle J (1993) What is your diagnosis? Ileocecocolic intussusception. JAVMA 203 (12), 1671-1672 PubMed.
  • Lansdown A B, Fox E A (1991) Colorectal intussusception in a young cat. Vet Rec 129 (19), 429-430 PubMed.
  • Lewis D D, Ellison G W (1987) Intussusception in dogs and cats. Comp Cont Ed (5), 523-532 VetMedResource.
  • Davies T D (1985) Intussusception in the cat. Vet Rec 117 (8), 191 PubMed.
  • Bellenger C R, Middleton D J, Ilkiw J E et al (1982) Double intussusception followed by reintussusception in a kitten. Vet Rec 110 (14), 323-324 PubMed.
  • Kavanagh M F (1981) Intussusception in Siamese cats. Vet Rec 109 (8), 165 PubMed.

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