Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Esophagus: stricture

Synonym(s): oesophagus

Contributor(s): Ed Hall, Cheryl Hedlund, Philip K Nicholls

Introduction

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Acquired at time of general anesthesia (most common) Esophagitis.
  • Lacerations due to foreign bodies Esophagus: foreign body.
  • Ingestion of caustic materials (rare).
  • Subsequent to esophageal surgery.
  • Accidental and iatrogenic trauma.
  • Esophagitis   →   fibrosis and stricture formation.

Specific

  • Prior general anesthesia for abdominal surgery.

Pathophysiology

  • Post-anesthetic stricture (most common) - erosive reflux esophagitis due to pooling of acidic gastric contents and intestinal proteases following relaxation of gastro-esophageal sphincter during general anesthetic.
  • Clinical signs develop within 1-6 weeks of anesthetic episode/inciting cause.
  • Initially fluids tolerated - eventually these regurgitated also.
  • Most at thoracic inlet - can be anywhere along thoracic esophagus.
  • Aspiration of regurgitated ingesta and development of megaesophagus cranial to stricture - important sequelae.

Timecourse

  • Clinical signs develop within 1-6 weeks of inciting cause.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Saedi S, Nyhus L M, Gabrys B F et al (1973) Pharmacological prevention of esophageal stricture - an experimental study in the cat. Am Surg 39 (8), 465-469 PubMed.


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