Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Cornea: herpesvirus keratitis

Contributor(s): Dennis E Brooks, David Gould, David Williams

Introduction

  • Cause: feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1).
  • Signs: are age dependent:
    • Neonates: neonatal conjunctivitis, ophthalmia neonatorum Neonatal ophthalmia.
    • Juveniles (ie primary infection): severe conjunctivitis and corneal epithelial defects   →   symblepharon Symblepharon  and keratoconjunctivitis sicca Eye: keratoconjunctivitis sicca.
    • Adults (ie probably recurrent infection): dendritic corneal epithelial defects or stromal keratitis.
  • Latent infection: feline herpesvirus can remain latent in the trigeminal ganglion   →   recrudescence following stress or corticosteroids.
  • Diagnosis: swabs/scrapes   →   polymerase chain reaction (PCR).
  • Treatment: antiviral agents.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Gould D J (2011) Feline Herpesvirus-1: Ocular manifestations, diagnosis and treatment options. J Feline Med Surg 13 (5), 333-346 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Hartley C (2014) The conjunctiva and third eyelid. In: BSAVA Manual of Small Animal Ophthalmology. 3rd edn. British Small Animal Veterinary Association. Eds David Gould & Gill McLellan. pp 182-199.
  • Gould D J, Papasouliotis K (2013) Veterinary Microbiology. In: Gelatt's Veterinary Ophthamology. 5th edn. Eds B Gilger, K N Gelatt.


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