Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Cardiotoxic plant poisoning

Contributor(s): Rosalind Dalefield, Nicola Bates

Introduction

  • Rare.
  • Cause: ingestion of toxic plants.
  • Signs: dysrhythmias and gastrointestinal signs.
  • Diagnosis: history and signs.
  • Treatment: control dysrhythmias and activated charcoal to prevent further absorption.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

Common plants include

Timecourse

  • Signs occur within 4-12 hours of ingestion and can last for 2-5 days.
  • If lethal doses are absorbed, death occurs in 12-24 hours.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Prevention

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Gwaltney-Brant S M, Rumbeiha W K (2002) Newer antidotal therapies. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 32 (2), 323-339 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Burrows G E & Tyrl R J (2013) Toxic plants of North America. 2nd edn. Ames, Iowa, John Wiley and Son.
  • Cooper M R & Johnson A W (1998) Poisonous plants and fungi in Britain - animal and human poisoning. The Stationary Office. 2nd edn.
  • Osweiler G, Hovda L R, Brutlag A G, Lee J A (eds) (2011) Blackwell's Five Minute Consult Clinical Companion. Small Animal Toxicology. Ames, Iowa, Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Turner NJ & Szczawinski AF (1991) Common poisonous plants and mushrooms of North America. Timber Press.

Organisation(s)


ADDED