Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Bladder: trauma rupture

Contributor(s): Ed Hall, Elisa Mazzaferro, Melissa Wallace

Introduction

  • Cause: blunt abdominal trauma, urethral obstruction Urethra: obstruction, neoplasia Bladder: neoplasia, iatrogenic.
  • Signs: anuria/hematuria; frequent unsuccessful attempts to urinate.
  • Treatment: usually surgical repair required.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Blunt abdominal trauma Abdomen: trauma: hit by car (HBC, kick).
  • Urethral obstruction: urolithiasis Urolithiasis, neoplasia Bladder: neoplasia, idiopathic inflammation.
  • Neoplastic infiltration.
  • Iatrogenic (surgical misadventure, urethral catheterization, manual evacuation).
  • Can be intraperitoneal or extraperitoneal leakage of urine.

Pathophysiology

  • Usually traumatic often associated with pelvic fractures.
  • Occasionally iatrogenic,eg catheterization Urethra: obstruction, over distension of bladder during contrast radiography.

Timecourse

  • Die within days if large rupture is not corrected.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Aumann M, Worth L T & Drobatz K J (1998) Uroperitoneum in cats: 26 cases (1986-1995). JAAHA 34 (4), 315-324 PubMed.
  • Léveillé R (1998) Ultrasonograpy of urinary bladder disorders. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 28 (4), 799-821 PubMed.
  • Osbourne C A, Sanderson S L, Lulich J P et al (1996) Medical management of iatrogenic rents in the wall of the feline urinary bladder. Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract 26 (3), 551-562 PubMed.


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