Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Birman cat distal polyneuropathy

Contributor(s): Laurent Garosi, Mark Lowrie

Introduction

  • Cause: suspected inherited neurodegenerative disease.
  • Signs: slowly progressive.
  • Diagnosis: pelvic limb ataxia, hypermetria in all four limbs, plantigrade stance with abduction of hocks.
  • Treatment: no known treatment.
  • Prognosis: poor prognosis.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Suspected inherited.
  • Suspected recessive mode of inheritance and sex-limited trait (all cats reported have been female).

Pathophysiology

  • Central-peripheral distal axonopathy (dying-back neuropathy).
  • Loss of myelinated and unmyelinated fibers in the peripheral nerves in addition to fiberloss in the central nervous system.

Timecourse

  • Onset of signs at 8-10 weeks of age.
  • Slow deterioration.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Coates J R, O'Brien D P (2004) Inherited peripheral neuropathies in dogs and cats.   Vet Clin Small Anim 34 (6), 1361-1401 PubMed.
  • Moreau P M, Vallat J M, Hugon J et al (1991) Peripheral and central distal axonopathy of suspected inherited origin in Birman cats. Acta Neuropathol 82 (2), 143-146 PubMed.
  • Moreau P M, Hugon J, Vallat J M (1989) Leucoencephalomyeloneuropathy in a litter of Birman cats. Proc Eur Soc Vet Neurol 3, 75-80.


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