Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Arthritis: polyarthritis - idiopathic

Contributor(s): Eithne Comerford

Introduction

  • Inflammatory, non-erosive, polyarthritis.
  • Cats which have been diagnosed with this condition have failed to satisfy the criteria for rheumatoid arthrtitis, SLE, and periosteal proliferative polyarthritis.
  • Other body systems may be involved; categorized (into 4) according to concomitant pathology.
  • Signs: complications, eg dermatitis, glomerulonephritis Glomerulonephritis, uveitis Uveitis: viral, retinitis.
  • Diagnosis: radiography, cytopathology.
  • Treatment: depends on etiology.
  • Prognosis: fair.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • A definite cause and effect relationship between the polysynovitis and the concomitant pathology has yet to be confirmed.

Pathophysiology

See immune mediated arthritides

  • Categories of the disease are classified by association with concomitant pathology. It is thought that co-existing pathology contributes to immune complex formation and thus leads to Type 3 (immune complex) hypersensitivity in the synovial membrane.

Type 1

  • The etiopathogenesis may be similar in all cases, but individual susceptibilities dictate which cats develop progressive disease.

Type 2

  • The chronic infection is thought to act as an antigen source for persistent immune complex formation.

Type 3

  • It is thought that the gastrointestinal disease leads to an increase in intestinal permeability to foreign antigens, resulting in chronic formation of immune complexes.

Type 4

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers


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