Felis ISSN 2398-2950

Adenoma / adenocarcinoma

Contributor(s): Malcolm Brearley, William Brewer Jr, Jane Dobson, Irene Rochlitz

Introduction

  • Common tumor type arising from glandular epithelial tissue.
  • Prognosis: depends on site.
  • Treatment: variable response to chemotherapy, surgery and/or radiation therapy which are the mainstays of treatment.
  • In general malignant tumors/adenocarcinomas are much more common than benign adenomas/adenomas.
  • Adenocarcinomas occur in the skin (sweat gland and ceruminous gland), oropharynx, nasal chamber, salivary gland, stomach, intestine, bile duct, gall bladder, mammary gland, larynx, trachea and lung.
  • Adenomas occur in the skin (sweat gland), oropharynx, intestine, bile duct, mammary gland, kidney and thyroid gland.
  • Adenocarcinomas are locally invasive and depending on site metastasize to local and distant sites
  • Adenomas are non-invasive and do not metastasize.

Pathogenesis

Predisposing factors

General

Pathophysiology

  • Malignant adenocarcinomas/adenocarcinomas much more common.
  • Adenocarcinomas are generally locally invasive and often metastasize to local and distant sites.
  • Gastrointestinal metastatic disease is usually abdominal.

Tumor behavior

  • Sweat gland and ceruminous gland adenocarcinomas - locally invasive, metastasis not common, to lungs, lymph nodes, liver, digits.
  • Salivary gland adenocarcinoma Salivary gland: neoplasia - limited studies suggest cure with excision followed by radiation therapy.
  • Mammary tumors  - 90% are adenocarcinoma and are aggressive. Systemic metastasis can occur - to lymph node, pleura, lung, liver, spleen, kidneys. Metastatic potential depends on size and histology.
  • Pulmonary adenocarcinoma - aggressive tumor.
  • Nasal adenocarcinoma - usually locally invasive but with low metastatic potential.
  • Intestinal adenocarcinomas often extend into mesentery. Distant metastasis to lymph nodes, spleen, lungs or kidney common in small intestinal adenocarcinomas, less common in large intestine.

Timecourse

  • Weeks/months.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Mellanby R J, Foale R, Friend E et al (2002) Anal sac adenocarcinoma in a Siamese cat. J Feline Med Surg (4), 205-207 PubMed.
  • Tanabe S, Nakadai T, Furuoka H et al (2002) Expression of mRNA of chemokine receptor CXCR4 in feline mammary adenocarcinoma. Vet Rec 151 (24), 729-733 PubMed.
  • Anderson T E, Legendre A M, McEntee M M (2000) Probable hypercalcemia of malignancy in a cat with bronchogenic adenocarcinoma. JAAHA 36 (1), 52-5 PubMed.
  • Kosovsky J E, Matthiesen D T & Patnaik A K (1988) Small intestinal adenocarcinoma in cats - 32 cases (1978-1985). JAVMA 192 (2), 233-5 PubMed.


ADDED