ISSN 2398-2950      

Felicola subrostratus

ffelis

Synonym(s): F. subrostratus, chewing louse, biting louse.


Introduction

Classification

Taxonomy

  • Order: Phthiraptera.
  • Suborder: Mallophaga.
  • Genus: Felicola.

Active Forms

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Resting Forms

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Clinical Effects

Epidemiology

Habitat

  • Permanent parasites on the skin of cats.
  • Highly host-specific for felidae.

Lifecycle

  • Felicola subrostratus (F. subrostratus) life cycle:
    • 1. Adult.
    • 2. Egg.
    • 3. Nymphs.

Transmission

  • By direct contact when nymphs or adults transfer to the hair of an in-contact dog/cat.
  • Eggs, nymphs or adults that have been knocked off into the environment are probably of little importance compared with animal-to-animal contact.
  • Fomite transfer, eg on grooming equipment.

Pathological effects

  • Rapid movement of lice through coat and hypersensitivity response can cause pruritus and self-excoriation.
  • Ranges from asymptomatic through to alopecia, dandruff and seborrhea with lesions from self-excoriation.

Other Host Effects

  • Feed on hair and epidermal debris but also, probably opportunistically, feed on blood from scabs and lesions due to self-excoriation.

Control

Control via animal

  • Insecticide treatment of animal and in-contact animals.
  • The egg stage can last 7-14 days. None of the insecticides are likely to penetrate the egg and so repeat treatment in 14 days is essential for insecticides that have little residual activity.
  • Improve condition of debilitated animals.

Control via chemotherapies

  • No insecticides have been licensed specifically for use against lice in cats. The following should be effective:

Control via environment

  • Bedding should be washed (high temperature) or treated with insecticide and cattery vacated for several days.
  • The egg stage can last 7-14 days so repeat treatments are essential for insecticides that have little residual activity.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Coman B J, Jones E H & Driesen M A (1981) Helminth parasites and arthropods of feral cats. Aust Vet J 57 (7), 324-327 PubMed.

Can’t find what you’re looking for?

We have an ever growing content library on Vetlexicon so if you ever find we haven't covered something that you need please fill in the form below and let us know!

 
 
 
 

To show you are not a Bot please can you enter the number showing adjacent to this field

 Security code