ISSN 2398-2985      

Gastric ulceration

Jreptile

Synonym(s): Gastrointestinal ulceration


Introduction

  • Poorly researched area with only a few case reports.
  • Etiology largely unknown.
  • Frequency of ulceration likely higher than reported.
  • Often develops as a secondary complication to underlying pathology.
  • Cause: stress, parasitic burden, long-term inappropriate husbandry, use of NSAIDs, foreign body.
  • Signs: often non-specific, eg lethargy, anemia, anorexia, regurgitation and/or vomiting, coelomic enlargement, weight loss, diarrhea.
  • Diagnosis: endoscopy, ultrasonography, radiography, hematology, biochemistry, histopathology, post-mortem findings
  • Treatment: analgesia, H2 blockers, appropriate husbandry, and nutrition.
  • Prognosis: good to guarded dependent on cause and chronicity of problem at the time of presentation.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

Predisposing factors

General

  • Large parasitic load.
  • Chronic stress.
  • Inappropriate husbandry in captivity.

Pathophysiology

Timecourse

  • Usually chronic underlying issues, weeks to months.
  • Acute ulcer perforation or gut lining may take place because of a foreign body ingestion.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Mans C (2013) Clinical update on diagnosis and management of disorders of the digestive system of reptiles. J Exotic Pet Med 22 (2), 141-162.
  • Buker M, Foldenauer U, Simova-Curd S et al (2010) Gastrointestinal obstruction caused by a radiolucent foreign body in a green iguana (Iguana Iguana). Can Vet J 51 (5), 511-514 PubMed.
  • Chia M Y, Jeng C R, Hsiao S H et al (2009) Entamoeba invadens myositis in a common water monitor lizard (Varanus salvator). Vet Pathol 46 (4), 673-676 PubMed.
  • Kubisch U, Fischer I, Hatt J M (2006) Gastric ulcer in green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Tierärztliche Praxis. Ausgabe K, Kleintiere/Heimtiere 34 (1), 50-53 VetMedResource.
  • Goldberg S R, Bursey C (1989) Physaloptera retusa (Nematoda, Physalopteridae) in naturally infected sagebrush lizards, Sceloporus graciosus (Iguanidae). J Wildl Dis 25 (3), 425-9 PubMed.

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