Exotis ISSN 2398-2985

Reptiles

Bandaging

Contributor(s): Vetstream Ltd, Mark Rowland

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Introduction

  • Bandage application and wound care for skin defects are consistent with those of other companion animals with the exception that the healing process is prolonged.
  • Except for deep or extensive wounds or those that may become contaminated, wounds on most lizards are best maintained open in a clean environment rather than bandaged.
  • Wound healing takes significantly longer in reptiles than in mammals or birds which increases the potential for bacterial contamination; antibiosis should be provided.
  • Care should be taken with open wounds on insectivorous reptiles to ensure the prey items do not predate on the open wound. Any prey not eaten immediately should be removed.

Uses

  • Covering of open wounds to protect and minimize wound trauma.
  • Provision of a microenvironment suitable for healing.
  • Prevent dehydration and infection.
  • Control of hemorrhage.
  • Provision of vacuum-assisted closure.

Advantages

  • Application of antibiotic ointments and gauze-packed syringe casings are ideal to allow hemorrhage control and prevent contamination; typically, these bandages are required for only a few days.

Disadvantages

  • Bandages may be cumbersome to lizards or may be a source of rubbing or other behaviors that attempt to remove the bandage.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

  • Fair to good.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Cheek R & Crane M (2017) Snakes. In: Exotic Animal Medicine for the Veterinary Technician. 3rd edn. Eds: Ballard B & Cheek R. Wiley-Blackwell. pp 137-181.
  • Wilson B (2017) Lizards. In: Exotic Animal Medicine for the Veterinary Technician. 3rd edn. Eds: Ballard B & Cheek R. Wiley-Blackwell. pp 95-136.
  • Girling S J (2013) An Overview of Reptile and Amphibian Therapeutics. In: Veterinary Nursing of Exotic Pets. 2nd edn. Wiley-Blackwell. pp 319-336.

Reproduced with permission from Bonnie Ballard & Ryan Cheek: Exotic Animal Medicine for the Veterinary Technician © 2017, and Simon J Girling: Veterinary Nursing of Exotic Pets © 2013, published by John Wiley & Sons.


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