Exotis ISSN 2398-2985

Reptiles

Nystatin

Contributor(s): Vetstream Ltd, David Perpinan

Introduction

Name

  • Nystatin.

Class of drug

  • Antifungal agent.

Description

Chemical name

  • (1S,3R,4R,7R,9R,11R,15S,16R,17R,18S,19E,21E, 25E,27E,29E,31E,33R,35S,36R,37S)-33-[(3-amino-3, 6-dideoxy-β-L-mannopyranosyl)oxy]-1, 3,4,7,9,11,17,37-octahydroxy-15, 16,18-trimethyl-13-oxo-14, 39-dioxabicyclo[33.3.1]nonatriaconta-19, 21,25,27,29,31-hexaene-36-carboxylic acid.

Molecular formula

  • C47H75NO17.

Molecular weight

  • 926.09.

Physical properties

  • Yellow to light tan, hygroscopic powder having a cereal-like odor.
  • Very slightly soluble in water.
  • Slightly to sparingly soluble in alcohol.
  • One mg of nystatin contains not less than 4400 units of activity.

Storage requirements

  • Store at room temperature in tight, light-resistant containers.
  • Avoid freezing the oral suspension or exposing to temperatures greater than 40°C/104°F.
  • Use after 3 months of first opening.
  • Nystatin deteriorates when exposed to heat, light, air or moisture.

Uses

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Indications

  • Relatively broad spectrum anti-fungal agent, noted for its activity aganist Candida spp  particularly Candida albicans.
  • It has been used to treat glossitis in chameleons caused by the fungus Chamaeleomyces (=Metarhizium) granulomatis. However, systemic spread has caused poor response to treatment even when combined with a systemic antifungal.
  • Commonly indicated to treat oral or gastrointestinal candidiasis in reptiles.
  • It may also be useful for the topical treatment of external lesions.

Administration

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Pharmacokinetics

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Adverse Reactions

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Schmidt V, Klasen L, Schneider J et al (2017) Fungal dermatitis, glossitis and disseminated visceral mycosis caused by different Metarhizium granulomatis genotypes in veiled chameleons (Chamaeleo calyptratus) and first isolation in healthy lizards. Vet Microbiol 207, 74-82 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Mader D R (2006) Ed Reptile Medicine and Surgery. Saunders Elsevier, USA. pp 1242.
  • McArthur S, Wilkinson R & Meyer J (2004) Medicine and Surgery of Tortoises and Turtles. Blackwell Publishing, UK. pp 579.
  • Tennant B (1999) Small Animal Formulary. 3rd edn. BSAVA, UK. ISBN: 0 905214 44 7

Organisation(s)

  • National Office of Animal Health (NOAH) Compendium of Data Sheets for Animal Medicines. Website: www.noahcompendium.co.uk.

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