Exotis ISSN 2398-2985

Reptiles

Methylprednisolone

Synonym(s): Methylprmethylprednisolone acetate, Methylprednisolone sodium succinate, Depo-Medrol, Medrol, Duralone, Medralone, Solu-Medrol, Depo-Medrone, Solu-Medrone

Contributor(s): Vetstream Ltd, David Perpinan

Introduction

Name

  • Methylprednisolone.

Class of drug

  • Corticosteroid.

Description

Chemical name

  • Methylprednisolone sodium succinate: pregna-1,4-diene-3,20-dione,21-(3-carboxy l-oxopropoxy)- 11,17-dihydroxy-6-methyl-, monosodium salt, (6〈,11®)-.

Molecular formula

  • C26H33NaO8 (methylprednisolone sodium succinate).

Molecular weight

  • 374.47.

Physical properties

  • Odorless, white or practically white, crystalline powder.
  • Practically insoluble in water and spraringly soluble in alcohol.
  • Methylprednisolone sodium succinate is very soluble in both water and alcohol.

Storage requirements

  • Room temperature.
  • Avoid freezing of acetate injection.
  • After reconstituting the sodium succinate injection, store at room temperature and use within 48 h.
  • Only use solutions that are clear.

Uses

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Indications

  • Anti-inflammatory.
  • Some forms may be suitable for alternate day use.
  • Spinal or head trauma (controversial).
  • Treatment for shock (controversial).
  • Treatment for lymphoma and other diseases.

Administration

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Pharmacokinetics

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Precautions

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Interactions

  • Information extrapolated from mammals.

with other drugs

Amphotericin B Amphotericin B or potassium-depleting diuretics (Frusemide, thiazides)
  • Hypokalemia may develop.
Insulin
  • Increase risk of GI ulceration.
Phenobarbitone or phenytoin
  • The metabolism of corticosteroids may be enhanced.
  • Increased risk of gastrointestinal ulceration if used concurrently with NSAIDs.

with diagnostic tests

  • May increase urine glucose levels.
  • May decrease serum T3 and T4 values.
  • Will increase steroid induced alkaline phosphatase in dogs.
  • Some cross reaction with cortisol assay; may interfere with interpretation of other tests, eg ACTH stimulation test.

Adverse Reactions

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Meredith A (2015) Ed BSAVA Small Animal Formulary. Part B: Exotic Pets. 9th edn. BSAVA, UK. pp 338.
  • Plumb D (2015) Plumb’s Veterinary Drug Handbook. 8th edn. Wiley-Blackwell. pp 1296.
  • Mader D R (2006) Ed Reptile Medicine and Surgery. Saunders Elsevier, USA. pp 1242.
  • Girling S J & Raiti P (2004) BSAVA Manual of Reptiles. BSAVA, UK. pp 383.

Organisation(s)

  • National Office of Animal Health (NOAH) Compendium of Data Sheets for Animal Medicines. Website: www.noahcompendium.co.uk.

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