Exotis ISSN 2398-2985

Reptiles

Anesthesia overview

Contributor(s): David Perpinan, Sarah Pellett

Introduction

  • Safe and effective reptile anesthesia may be challenging, as some experience and knowledge of specific anatomy and physiology are needed.
  • An advantage of reptile anesthesia is that knowing one or two protocols may be enough to anesthetize most species seen in practice.

Review of anatomy and physiology affecting anesthesia

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Pre-anesthetic assessment

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Anesthetic induction

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Anesthetic maintenance

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Anesthetic monitoring

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Anesthetic recovery

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Bertelsen M F (2014) Squamates (Snakes and Lizards). In: Zoo Animals and Wildlife Immobilization and Anesthesia. 2nd edn. Eds: West G, Heard D & Caulkett N. Wiley-Blackwell, USA. pp 351-363.
  • Vigani A (2014) Chelonia (Tortoises, Turtles, and Terrapins). In: Zoo animals and wildlife immobilization and anesthesia. 2nd edn. Eds: West G, Heard D & Caulkett N. Wiley-Blackwell, USA. pp 365-387.
  • Schumacher J & Yelen T (2006) Anesthesia and Analgesia. In: Reptile Medicine and Surgery. 2nd edn. Ed: Mader D R. Saunders Elsevier, USA. pp 442-452.


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