Exotis ISSN 2398-2985

Reptiles

Uveitis

Contributor(s): Vetstream Ltd, David Vella

Wiley Blackwell logo

Introduction

  • Cause: microbial infection (bacteria, fungi, viruses) or neoplasia; infection can be secondary to trauma.
  • Signs: inflammation of the uveal tract, inflammatory cells in the anterior chamber of the eye.
  • Diagnosis: slit lamp biomicroscopy, blood culture, hematology, biochemistry.
  • Treatment: topical steroids or non-steroidal agents, topical antimicrobials, surgical removal of purulent debris.
  • Prognosis: dependent on underlying cause; systemic infection and septicemia may herald a guarded prognosis.
Print off the Owner Factsheets on Eye conditions in chameleons, Eye conditions in geckos, Eye conditions in Lizards, Eye conditions in snakes, Eye conditions in terrapins and/or Eye conditions in tortoises to give to your clients.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • The majority of cases in reptiles are associated with systemic Gram-negative infections, such as dissemination of Pseudomas spp which led to uveitis with hypopyon in an Indonesian blue-tongued skink or Aeromonas septicemia as reported in one study.
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae infection has been found to be the cause of anterior uveitis, again manifest as hypopyon in a group of Tokay geckos.
  • Whether this association between septicemia and intraocular inflammation shows the presence of infectious organisms in the eye is unclear.
  • Circulating lipopolysaccharide, as would be seen in such a septicemia, can lead to a breakdown of the blood-aqueous barrier with resultant flare without a frank intraocular infection, as least in rats when used as a laboratory model of uveitis, but the evidence base for this as the cause of reptile uveitic signs is unclear.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to purchase a 30 day trial, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Ballard B & Cheek R (2017) Exotic Animal Medicine for the Veterinary Technician. 3rd edn. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Girling S J (2013) Veterinary Nursing of Exotic Pets. 2nd edn. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Williams D (2012) The Reptile Eye. In: Ophthalmology of Exotic Pets. Wiley-Blackwell, UK. pp 185-187.

Reproduced with permission from Bonnie Ballard & Ryan Cheek: Exotic Animal Medicine for the Veterinary Technician © 2017, Simon J Girling: Veterinary Nursing of Exotic Pets © 2013, and David L Williams: Ophthalmology of Exotic Pets © 2012, published by John Wiley & Sons.


ADDED