Exotis ISSN 2398-2985

Reptiles

Subspectacular abscessation

Contributor(s): Vetstream Ltd, David Vella

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Introduction

  • Cause: ascending nasolacrimal duct infection or hematogenous spread of infection secondary to systemic infection.
  • Signs: mass in the ventral subspectacular space/entire ocular surface; opacification of the spectacle.
  • Diagnosis: clinical signs.
  • Treatment: surgical removal/irrigation, antibiotics.
  • Prognosis: favorable if infection controlled and source of systemic infection isolated and treated.
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Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Stomatitis [Stomatitis] may result in ascending nasolacrimal duct infections.
  • If obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct manifests in snakes as bullous spectaculopathy Bullous spectaculopathy, rather than the epiphora which would be seen in species without a spectacle, it is not surprising that infection of the nasolacrimal duct in snakes is seen as an abscess manifesting in the space between the cornea and spectacle -> subspectacular abscess; this is usually a unilateral disease.
  • Hematogenous spread secondary to systemic infection; may result in unilateral or bilateral disease.

Predisposing factors

General

  • Stomatitis may result in ascending nasolacrimal duct infections.
  • Systemic disease may result in hematogenous spread of infection.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Ballard B & Cheek R (2017) Exotic Animal Medicine for the Veterinary Technician. 3rd edn. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Girling S J (2013) Veterinary Nursing of Exotic Pets. 2nd edn. Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Williams D (2012) The Reptile Eye. In: Ophthalmology of Exotic Pets. Wiley-Blackwell, UK. pp 181-182.

Reproduced with permission from Bonnie Ballard & Ryan Cheek: Exotic Animal Medicine for the Veterinary Technician © 2017, Simon J Girling: Veterinary Nursing of Exotic Pets © 2013, and David L Williams: Ophthalmology of Exotic Pets © 2012, published by John Wiley & Sons.


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