Exotis ISSN 2398-2985

Guinea Pigs

Dermatophytosis

Synonym(s): Dermatomycosis, Ringworm

Contributor(s): Cathy Johnson-Delaney, Vicki Baldrey

Introduction

  • Cause: dermatophyte, most commonly Trichophyton mentagrophytes. New strain Arthroderma benhamiae showing up in United States, Canada.
  • Signs: hair loss, well-demarcated lesions with crusts, erythema, scale, some cases pruritic.
  • Diagnosis: skin scraping with fungal preparation, fungal culture.
  • Treatment: topical and/or systemic.
  • Prognosis: good if underlying immune compromise resolved; guarded if Arthroderma strain.   
Print off the Owner factsheets on Alopecia, Common health problems and Skin problems to give to your clients.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

Predisposing factors

General

  • First week after birth through weaning.
  • Stress.
  • High environmental temperatures and humidity.

Specific

  • Immunocompromised, stressed guinea pigs.
  • Skin abrasions or lesions that are open to fungal infection.
  • Pet breeders, shows, pet shop populations.
  • Parturition.

Pathophysiology

  • Infection may cause circumscribed lesions in the epidermis and hair follicles.

Timecourse

  • Usually days or weeks depending on age and immune status.

Epidemiology

  • Direct contact with infected cavies.
  • Direct contact with contaminated housing.
  • Fomite spread by humans handling infected cavies or housing.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Fehr M (2015) Zoonotic potential of dermatophytosis in small mammals. J Exotic Pet Med 24 (3), 308-316 ExotPetMed.
  • Nenoff P, Uhrlav S, Kuger C et al (2014) Trichophyton species of Arthroderma benhamiae - a new infectious agent in dermatology. J Deutsche Dermatol Gesellschaft 12 (7), 571-581 PubMed.  
  • Donnelly T M (2000) What's your diagnosis? Mild alopecia and fur loss in a guinea pig. Lab Animal  29 (2), 21-23 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Harkness J E, Turner P V VandeWoude S & Wheler C L (2010) Specific Diseases and Conditions. Dermatophytosis. In: Harkness and Wagner's Biology and Medicine of Rabbits and Rodents. 5th edn. Wiley-Blackwell. pp 287-289.
  • Longley L (2009) Rodents: Dermatoses. In: BSAVA Manual of Rodents and Ferrets. Eds: Keeble E & Meredith A. British Small Animal Veterinary Association. pp 107-122.
  • Percy D H & Barthold S W (2001) Guinea pigs, Mycotic infections. In: Pathology of Laboratory Rodents and Rabbits. 3rd edn. Iowa State University Press, Ames. pp 227-228.


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