ISSN 2398-2985      

Tail amputation

4ferrets

Introduction

  • Tail amputation is a common procedure in ferrets.
  • Reasons for tail amputation include:
    • Trauma:
      • Crushing or degloving injuries.
      • Trauma from other animals, eg dog bites.
    • Neurological damage.
    • Musculoskeletal neoplasia: although uncommon, chordomas Chordoma are the most commonly reported neoplasia in ferrets:
      • Frequently found at the distal tail.
      • Locally invasive.
      • Possibility for metastasis: cutaneous metastasis has rarely been reported in ferrets.
      • Tail amputation curative if no metastasis has occurred.
      • Reported in animals as young as 3 months of age.

Uses

Advantages

  • Offers a quick resolution to many traumas.
  • Ferrets recover quickly from tail amputations.
  • Curative for many tumors detected early.
  • Cheaper alternative to recurrent visits and bandage changes in cases of trauma.

Disadvantages

  • Requires general anesthesia.
  • Cosmetic change: most owners accept this quickly.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

  • Good.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Cho E-S, Kim J-Y, Ryu S-Y et al (2011) Chordoma in the tail of a ferret. Lab Anim Res 27 (1), 53-57 PubMed.
  • Munday J S, Brown C A & Richey L J (2004) Suspected metastatic coccygeal chordoma in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo). J Vet Diagn Invest 16 (5), 454-458 PubMed.

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