Exotis ISSN 2398-2985

Ferrets

Urinalysis: overview

Contributor(s): Vetstream Ltd, Vicki Baldrey

Overview

  • Urinalysis is an inexpensive test that can be easily and quickly performed in most veterinary practices.
  • Results can provide useful information and should be part of the minimum database for a patient.
  • Results can often help veterinarians diagnose both urinary tract disorders and systemic diseases.

Sampling

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Tests

Methodologies

​​Physical appearance
  • Color.
  • Turbidity.
Chemical analsysis
  • Warm refrigerated sample to room temperature.
  • Mix the urine specimen thoroughly.
  • Pipette urine onto test pads.
  • Hold horizontally to avoid run-off between pads.
  • Read test at correct interval.
  • Determine specific gravity by refractometer; test dipstick specific gravity is not accurate.
Microscopic examination
  • Centrifuge at 3000 rpm for 5 min.
  • Decant supernatant.
    • EITHER add 1 drop of sedistain or a supravital stain such as Sternheimer-Malbin to the sediment.
    • OR leave 0.5 ml urine in centrifuge tube.
  • Re-suspend sediment by tapping the centrifuge tube.
  • Transfer one drop of sediment to a microscope slide and place a coverslip over it.
  • Lower the condenser on the microscope to improve contrast.
  • Systematically examine the slide under a low power objective, assessing quantity and type of sediment.
  • Examine sediment under the high power objective to assess cell morphology and to detect bacteria, crystals and cells within the sample.

Availability

  • All veterinary practices.
  • External laboratories.

Result Data

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Duhamelle A, Langlois I & Desmarchelier M (2015) Transient diabetes mellitus in a domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo). Can Vet J 56 (7), 737-740 PubMed.
  • Eshar D, Wyre N R & Brown D C (2012) Urine specific gravity values in clinically healthy young pet ferrets (Mustela furo). Journal of Small Animal Practice 53, 115–119 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Quesenberry K E & Orcutt C (2012) Basic Approach to Veterinary Care. In: Ferrets, Rabbits and Rodents Clinical Medicine and Surgery. 3rd edn. Eds: Quesenberry K E & Carpenter J W. Elsevier Saunders, St. Louis. pp 13-26.
  • Lennox A (2009) Ferrets: Clinical pathology. In: BSAVA Manual of Ferrets and Rodents. Eds: Keeble E & Meredith A. British Small Animal Veterinary Association, Gloucester, UK. pp 230-236.
  • Schoemaker N J (2009) Ferrets: endocrine and neoplastic diseases. In: BSAVA Manual of Ferrets and Rodents. Eds: Keeble E & Meredith A. British Small Animal Veterinary Association, Gloucester, UK. pp 320-329.


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