Exotis ISSN 2398-2985

Ferrets

Testicular neoplasia

Contributor(s): Cathy Johnson-Delaney, David Perpinan

Introduction

  • Cause: neoplastic changes in the testicles; seen more commonly if cryptorchid.
  • Signs: uni- or bilateral enlargement of testicle(s).
  • Diagnosis: FNA, cytology, biopsy, histopathology.
  • Treatment: castration.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Seen in middle-aged to older intact hobs.
  • Reported neoplasms include Leydig or interstitial cell tumors, seminoma, Sertoli cell tumor and carcinomas of the rete testis.
  • Metastasis to the liver has been reported in one ferret with a Sertoli cell tumor.

Predisposing factors

Specific

  • Testicular neoplasia Testicular neoplasia in ferrets, as in other species, is more common in cryptorchid animals.

Pathophysiology

  • The presence of multiple, different neoplasms in the same testis has been reported several times.

Epidemiology

  • Interstitial (or Leydig) cell tumors are the most common testicular neoplasia in ferrets.
  • Testicular neoplasia is uncommon in pet ferrets as most of them are neutered at an early age.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Fox J G & Marini R P (2014) Eds Biology and Diseases of the Ferret. 3rd edn. Wiley Blackwell, USA. pp 835.


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