Exotis ISSN 2398-2985

Ferrets

Oral neoplasia

Contributor(s): Cathy Johnson-Delaney, Vicki Baldrey

Introduction

  • Primary tumors of the oral cavity, or secondary to tumors of the head such as osteoma.
  • Signs: swellings, proliferations, secondary abscess, compromised dental structures, loose teeth.
  • Diagnosis: radiography, biopsy.
  • Treatment: surgical resection if possible.
  • Prognosis: depends on type of neoplasia; often poor.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Tissue source may be any dental tissue, including gingiva, periodontal structures, bone, tooth.
  • Most common:
    • Squamous cell carcinoma.
    • Osteoma.
    • Lymphoma.
  • Tumors can be benign, such as an epulis, or malignant.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Johnson-Delaney C A (2016) Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Ferrets and Other Exotic Companion Carnivores. Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract 19 (3), 901-928.
  • Nemec A, Zadravec M & Raenik J (2016) Oral and dental diseases in a population of domestic ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). J Small Anim Pract 57 (10), 553-560.

Other sources of information

  • Hoefer H L, Fox J G & Bell J A (2012) Ferrets: Gastrointestinal Diseases. In: Ferrets, Rabbits and Rodents: Clinical Medicine and Surgery. 3rd edn. Eds: Quesenberry K E & Carpenter J W. Elsevier Saunders, St Louis. pp 27-45.


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