ISSN 2398-2985      

Ibuprofen toxicity

4ferrets

Introduction

  • Cause: ingestion of ibuprofen tablets and/or liquid.
  • Signs: depression, ataxia, tremors, coma; gastrointestinal signs, eg vomiting, retching, diarrhea, melena; polyuria, polydipsia.
  • Diagnosis: history and clinical signs.
  • Treatment: overall, treatment should be aimed at preventing or treating gastric ulceration, renal failure, CNS effects or possible hepatic effects.
  • Prognosis: good for early decontamination; poor to grave once ferret is seizuring/comatose.
  • Ibuprofen is an NSAID and in some countries is available over the counter:
    • Ibuprofen tablets (50, 100 and 200 mg) and  liquid formulation for children (20-40 mg/mL).
    • Prescription strength tablets available in 400, 800 and 1200 mg.
  • Ibuprofen has been used in ferrets at 1 mg/kg q12-24h.
  • Ibuprofen acts by inhibiting production of prostaglandins associated with pain.
Print off the Owner factsheet on Poisoning to give to your clients.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Ingestion of ibuprofen tablets and/or liquid formulation for children.
 Ingestion of any human formulation can cause toxicity.

Predisposing factors

General

  • Owners dosing their ferrets or ferrets gaining access to and ingesting ibuprofen.

Pathophysiology

  • In an overdose, ibuprofen inhibits prostaglandins that protect gastric mucosa which predisposes the ferret to gastric ulcers and those that maintain normal renal blood flow leading to acute renal failure.
  • The minimum lethal dose is 220 mg/kg.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Fox J G & Marini R P (2014) Biology and Diseases of the Ferret. 3rd edn. Wiley Blackwell, USA. pp 835.
  • Mayer J & Donnelly T M (2013) Clinical Veterinary Advisor: Birds and Exotic Pets. Elsevier, USA. pp 752.

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