ISSN 2398-2985      

Flea infestation

4ferrets

Introduction

  • Cause: Ctenocephalides felis (cat flea) and/or Ctenocephalides canis (dog flea).
  • Signs: pruritus, self-trauma, skin lacerations, alopecia, excoriation.
  • Diagnosis: visible fleas, dirt tests.
  • Treatment: selamectin, moxidectin, imidacloprid, pyrethrins.
  • Prognosis: good.
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Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Infestation with Ctenocephalides felis and/or Ctenocephalides canis fleas.
  • Infestation usually signals that other pets in the household have fleas.
  • Fleas also will be present in the environment.
  • Flea bites cause intense pruritus particularly in those individuals where hypersensitivity to flea saliva exists.
  • Flea bite dermatitis and hypersensitivity has been seen in ferrets.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Wenzel U, Heine J, Mengel H et al (2008) Efficacy of imidacloprid 10%/moxidectin 1% (Advocate (R)/Advantage Multi (TM)) against fleas (Ctenocephalides felis felis) on ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Parasitol Res 103 (1), 231-234 PubMed.

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OWNER FACTSHEETS

Parasitic skin diseases

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