Exotis ISSN 2398-2985

Ferrets

Dermatophytosis

Synonym(s): Dermatomycosis, Ringworm

Contributor(s): Cathy Johnson-Delaney, Bev Panto

Introduction

  • Fungal infection of the skin.
  • Commonly called ringworm.
  • Report in one ferret with pneumonia and an ulcerated footpad attributed to Blastomyces dermatitidis. Histoplasmosis and coccidiomycosis have also been diagnosed as causing subcutaneous nodules. For this section, the discussed is limited to primary dermatomycosis.
  • Cause: Microsporum canis or Trichophyton mentagrophytes.
  • Signs: alopecia, broken hairs, erythema, scaling, crusting.
  • Diagnosis: microscopic examination, hair pluck, trichogram, fungal culture.
  • Treatment: microconazole, miconazole, terbinafine, clotrimazole, enilconazole; oral griseofulvin in severe cases.
  • Prognosis: good.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Dermatomycosis is not a common disease in ferrets, but is seen in highly stressed, immunosuppressed, young, or malnorished ferrets and those in an animal shelter.
  • It is caused by most commonly by Microsporum canis,  but Trichophyton mentagrophytes is also seen.
  • Transmission is by direct contact.
  • In contact domestic pets may be at risk, or a source of infection.
  • It is also possible that dermatophytosis can be contracted from contact with an infected human.
  • Spontaneous remission of lesions has been reported, but in the author’s experience does not seem to happen.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers


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