Equis ISSN 2398-2977

Urethra: urethroplasty

Contributor(s): Terry Blanchard, Rob Lofstedt, Graham Munroe, Madeleine Campbell

Introduction

  • Urethral laceration (urethrorhexis) occurs in horses following kicks, falls, self-trauma or iatrogenically during castration.
  • Particularly susceptible areas include the extrapelvic urethra at the ischial area and distal penis - due to their superficial and unprotected position.
  • Primary repair of the laceration may be necessary.

Uses

  • Primary repair of urethral lacerations especially in complete transection.

Advantages

  • Perineal injuries can be repaired in standing sedated horse.
  • May decrease incidence of complications especially urethral stricture.

Disadvantages

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

  • Guarded - depends upon primary specific injury and range of structures affected.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Harrison J & Mustaq I (2017) Single stage urethroplasty for perineal hypospadias in a horse: A case report. J Pediatr Urol 13 (1), 84-85 PubMed.
  • Beard W (1991) Standing urogenital surgery. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract 7 (3), 669-684 PubMed.
  • Van Harreveld P D et al (1998) Urethral surgery in horses. Comp Cont Educ 20 (6), 739-745 VetMedResource.
  • Toddhunter R J & Parker J E (1988) Surgical repair of urethral transection in a horse. JAVMA 193 (9),1085-1086 PubMed.


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